Creative artwork

Creative artwork

What?

Illustrations and artwork to accompany text or act as a focal point in design.

Who?

Biotech, Advertising, Publishing, Journalism, Public engagement, Education.

Why?

To represent ideas, engage viewers, and communicate key messages.

Engaging with readers

Engaging with readers and leaving a lasting impression can be difficult. In biomedical science you might be bombarded with hundreds of new research articles every day. You may have spent months or years on your piece of research, but just getting someone to click to your article is half the battle.

Standing out from the crowd

Standing out from the crowd is hard. It’s particularly hard in an information saturated landscape. To get noticed you need a strong idea and creative advert that will capture attention and encourage conversation. Visuals can definitely help with this. If your viewer only sees you for a few seconds, they’ll probably remember the image the most.  

Illustration for readers

Editorial illustration accompanies science feature and news articles in both mainstream media and more specialist publications. It aims to draw in the reader, concisely summarising the main themes of the article. Not only does it make the article more visually appealing, it also makes it more likely to be selected and shared online via social media.

We aim to help you stimulate interest and excitement in your science among the public giving it a broader perspective.  

How we can help

Science, Art, Storytelling

Here at Vivid Biology, we blend together storytelling, composition, and a great understanding of science to create visuals that get to the heart of what your story is about. We understand that it’s not enough just to represent the science being mentioned. Artwork also has to help the reader grasp the tone, angle, and larger context of the science being discussed.

We have extensive scientific and artistic experience which allows us to produce artwork that will compliment your established branding, as well as create new identities for new products. Often the artwork we create is used as the basis for advertising campaigns and resized or reworked to fit all kinds of advertising sizes.

How we create editorial illustrations

News articles usually require tight turnarounds. It’s not always possible to create a brand new illustration in time for the news cycle, but we have plenty of past illustrations available for license if you need something to accompany a piece.

The brief

For illustrations to accompany a feature piece, we are usually sent through an early draft or brief synopsis of the themes to be covered. We’ll then work on some concept sketches for artwork ideas that we think grasp the key concepts. At this point it’s useful to know whether it’s a main cover illustration that’s required, or multiple smaller illustrations, so that we can adjust the complexity of the concept sketches. Some clients prefer to leave this decision until they see the ideas we present though.

Pencil sketches

Once the sizes of the artworks and concept sketches have been agreed upon, we’ll work these up into pencil sketches. We’ll then forward these on to you to check if there are any edits that need to be made. Edits are much easier to make at the pencil stage than later on so it’s best to mention any now.

Inking and tracing

Once the pencil drafts are approved we’ll start inking up the illustration. We’ll then scan it into Photoshop and do a quick clean-up. At this stage we’ll check with you whether you want the illustration to be an infinitely scalable vector or to remain as a fixed size image. Vectors require the line art to be traced in illustrator, which can result in lines that look overly smoothed.

The final draft

We’ll then do a first round of colouring, and check in with a first draft. At this stage it’s easy to move some of the elements around, and to change the colours, although wholesale redrawing is much harder. Once the colour choices and any further changes are approved, we’ll send over a final version to the specifications that you require.

How we create advertising illustrations

Projects great and small

We also work on much smaller projects, like individual event posters. These use illustration to summarise the key themes of the event with an image that stands out in the mind of the viewer (and also when stuck to notice boards).

Who, what, where

We’ll want to know what the advertisement is for, who it’s aimed at, and where it’s going to appear. An advertisement at a biotechnology conference that features a big strand of DNA won’t exactly be a novelty. It’s important for us to get an idea of what landscape the advertisement will exist in, who you want to see it, and what THEY care about.

Emotional connection

For a big promotional illustration, the details of the product are undoubtedly important, but the crux of the artwork should be about how the product makes the user feel. This might be relief that even the tiniest impurity is detected, joy at how simple a product makes a tricky lab process, or the endless possibilities available now that they can get such accurate readings.

The ideas stage

For big promotional illustrations, the drafts and concepts stage is often quite lengthy, and can take several weeks depending on how long it takes us to find a solution you’re happy with. Once we’ve found one we’ll get to work on creating the large scale final artwork.

Ballpark figures for publishing

We price illustrations based on the time taken to produce them and the licence required. Our default terms for new illustrations are exclusive use in the chosen media for 2 years. We don’t tend to work for hire or transfer copyright.

Every brief is different, but we’ve included some examples of pricing below.

We can also license previously created illustrations for reuse in books.

Product
Size
Price (£)

Online

(prices dependent on duration of use)

Full screen

Banner

Spot

from £500

from £250

from £150

General Newspaper or Magazine illustration

(prices dependent on print run size)

Cover

Full page

Spot

from £800

from £400

from £150

Trade magazine or journal illustration

(prices dependent on print run size)

Cover

Full page

Spot

from £600

from £300

from £100

Fiction and non-fiction

(prices dependent on print run size)

Cover

Full page

Spot

from £1000

from £450

from £200

Textbook

(prices dependent on print run size)

Cover

Full page

Spot

from £600

from £300

from £100

Ballpark figures for advertising

The price of the artwork is made up of the illustration fee and the licence fee. This means that a simple illustration that forms a worldwide campaign could end up being more expensive than a complex illustration for use at a single trade fair.

In general the licensing fee needs to be negotiated for each new project, particularly since exclusive rights might be needed, however for smaller pieces of promotion we can bundle it together..

Service

Size

Price (£)

Poster

(new artwork)

A4

A3

A2

250

400

700

Poster

(using old artwork)

A4

A3

A2

100

170

250

Large format artwork for advertising

Concept work

Artwork production

from 1000

from 2000

Science Art exhibitions

SciArt projects are generally funded by grant funding. If you’d like us to work on a bid with you then please get in touch.

On the right are the kind of things you should budget for when writing up grants.

The Artists Union England provides guidance about this should you want to find out more.

https://www.artistsunionengland.org.uk/

http://www.payingartists.org.uk/

Day rate for on-site work

You’ll usually need to pay a day rate for required activities that don’t involve creating artwork, such as talks, evaluations or workshops.

Exhibition fee

If you’d like to exhibit artwork that’s already been created it’s normal to pay the artist an appearance fee. This is particularly the case if it’s new work and you haven’t contributed to materials and production costs.

Materials and production costs

Budget for materials and production costs. This would cover materials, studio rental, administrative and living costs, particularly if onsite work is required.

Copyright or ownership

These fees cover production of the artwork, exhibition of the pieces, and coverage of the event. They do not usually mean that you own the final artworks.